Category: Books You Should Be Reading NOW!

We love these books. You will too!

The Fire This Time, Part One

The Right-Wing Riot is proud to be serializing "The Fire This Time," Roy M. Griffis' prequel to his novel "The Big Bang."  Part One is below.

 

The Fire This Time

It was just a little school.  Like a lot of places there in the Sonoran desert, it was a one story building from the 50’s, naturally build of cinder block, with a flat roof, all of it painted a remarkably less-than-festive flat white.  During the three years Whistler had lived in the vicinity of the school (calling the dwellings scattered over nearly ten miles of sand, scrub, saguaro cactus and every variety of pointy, pokey plantlife known to man a “neighborhood” seemed impossibly optimistic to him);  during that time he’d observed the little kids outside every spring painting murals on the longest wall, which faced the playground.

The bright, simplistic figures standing awkwardly and anatomically incorrectly on the big cement canvas were usually good for a chuckle as he drove by, unless the sun was jabbing those knitting needles of light in his sleep-deprived eyes.  On those mornings, nothing made him happy except the thought of fleeing the unrelenting glare of the desert daylight and retreating to the stuffy dark cocoon of the couch at the back of the trailer.

Still, even on his worst day, Whistler wouldn’t have wanted to see the little school burn, nor could he have imagined such a small structure would burn for so long.

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Asking the Most Powerful Question to Protect Your Family

The question “What if…?” is arguably one of the most important questions humans have ever asked, right up there with “How come..?” By posing the problem “What if…” man allows himself to discover answers. Even a failed “What if…” provides the attentive viewer with information. Early Man may have asked “What if we poke that Saber Tooth Tiger in the testicles with a stick? Go ahead, you do it.” So he asked and so he learned. But “What if…” can also provide you with unexpected solutions, such as “What if a bunch of us Australopithecines teamed up against that mastodon,” which lead to the invention of the first all-you-can eat buffet, the benefits of which we enjoy even down to modern times.

Buffets aside, one of the problems of our modern times is the complexity and technological entanglement of the civilization we’ve built. The need to ask “What if…” is more important than ever, if for no other reason than the desire to protect family and clan. Because of the enormity of the factors to consider, the layman questioner could be overwhelmed with scenarios and data. That is where both Dr. James Jay Carafano and I (Roy M. Griffis, who IS the Prince of Whitebread) come riding to your rescue, albeit from opposite directions. The good Doctor hales from the direction of facts and experience, and myself from the land of fiction.

Click here to read the rest over at Pajamas Media!

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“Superego” – It’s not all in your head

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Stop me if you've heard this before:  Robert A. Heinlein and Mickey Spillane walk into a bar...

If they ever had sat down with a fifth of Jack Daniels and in the company of a sultry red-headed "typist" named Velma, a novel like Superego might have been the result.

The setting --- an interstellar civilization, alien races mingling with humanity, Artificial Intelligence sending your escape craft jumping through wormholes --- is pure 50's SF, hearkening back to to the Grand Master himself, RAH.  That part alone is handled with a scary ease that borders on mastery (if you hear envy leaking into this review, please disregard it as I am above any petty professional jealousies over the skill of my competition...er, comrades in pen).

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The Fire This Time

Samzinet Fire This Time 

(A story from before The Big Bang)

 

It was just a little school. Like a lot of places there in the Sonoran desert, it was a one-story building from the 50’s, built of cinder block, with a flat roof, all of it painted a remarkably less-than-festive flat white. During the three years Whistler had lived in the vicinity of the school (calling the dwellings scattered over nearly ten miles of sand, scrub, saguaro cactus and every variety of pointy, pokey plant life known to man a “neighborhood” seemed impossibly optimistic to him), he’d observed the little kids outside every spring painting murals on the longest wall, which faced the playground.

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Book Bomb on Tuesday, January 20!

Exploding onto Amazon on December 16

You might know me as co-creator of the satiric strip “Truesbury.”  You might also know me from my short fiction published at Liberty Island.  More likely you don’t know me at all.  But I know you.  You’re a voice for conservative and libertarian values.  Maybe you’re even concerned about the lack of conservative viewpoints in popular culture.

We want to do everything we can to let conservatives know that good fiction with their values is now available. So on January 20 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. PST (1-4 EST), we’re staging a book bomb to push The Big Bang (written by moi, Roy M. Griffis, who IS the Prince of Whitebread) up the charts.  The Riot is shamelessly asking our friends and supporters (especially you conservatives and libertarians) to spread the word.  If you could blog or tweet during that time (1/20, from 1000 - 1300 PST), sharing a link to the book (http://goo.gl/eeqbyD) and encouraging your readers or friends to purchase the novel in paperback or e-book, we all win!

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“The Big Bang” over at the National Review.

There's an excerpt of Roy M. Griffis' novel, The Big Bang, over at the National Review.  This is how it begins:

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following article is excerpted from Roy Griffis's novel The Big Bang, published by Liberty Island Media. Set in a United States destroyed by Islamic terrorists, the novel chronicles the struggle of an underground resistance fighting to rebuild their nation.

When he opened the passenger door, he found his side of the Jeep filled with bags and packages. Hanner scooped up most of them, shoved them in the back. There were already two long packages lying on top of the coolers. One squarishbox was on the floor. Baldwin climbed in, put the strangely heavy box between his feet, and buckled up.

His eyes on the road, Hanner told him, “Open that up, Mr. Baldwin.” He turned onto the main road, passing the small residential area. People were outside holding cell phones, looking to the skies, talking to their neighbors. “You ever use one of these?”

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An outstanding Young Adult/Adult novel!

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A most unexpected delight by Ms. Heavey. While it is clearly a novel for Young Adults, I, as a bitter misanthrope of over 50, found it very compelling and even moving, which is a real testament to the strength of Kia’s writing and the story itself. I don’t want to get hung up on the plot, because a lot of the joy of the novel is in the discovery of the story and characters, but I found them very real: funny, fallible human beings that I wanted to know more about.

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